Gozzie launches Maclord’s Blog

Maclord's blog

Yet another blog featuring tips and tricks about Macs, OS X, and cross-platform working and the iPhone. Sounds like another “me, too” blog, right?

Well, hopefully, the Maclord’s Blog will create an otherwise impression soon enough – with some truly extraordinary stories like:

Could you imagine, for example, that you could corrupt an iPod with exported calendar info from your Facebook account when synced with your Calendar app and then sync it with iTunes?

Did you know you could not only read NTFS volumes mounted on your Mac or Mac OS X-machine but also write to them?

You are welcome to Maclord’s Blog.

Feel free to post comments here for any suggestions – topics and subjects, for example, that you wish to be covered on the blog.

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64-bit Windows support in Boot Camp

Just spotted this over at Mac Rumors, that there are a few cases reported Mac Pro users can boot into their 64-bit Windows Vista (GO confirms XP support still limited to 32-bit on Bootcamp).

From the manual, Page 4, the message said:

Important: You must use a single full-install Windows installation disc (Service Pack 2 is required for Windows XP installations). Do not use an upgrade version of Windows and do not install an earlier version of Windows XP and attempt to update it later to SP2 or later. Use only 32-bit versions of Windows. If you have a Mac Pro introduced in late 2007 or later, you can use a 64-bit version of Windows Vista.

Also, from your Mac Pro restore disk (on newer shipped models, apparently), you should be able to find a file “BookCamp64.exe” under “Drivers\Apple\”, under Windows. There a spread/file sharing of this file on the internet whom a forum member has kindly shared with other Mac Pro user. As I have never used Boot Camp and don’t have a Mac at all, I can’t say if this “BootCamp64” will work with all other 64-bits processors used by Mac. It in understand that all Mac Pro are 64-bit capable.

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‘OpenMac’ Promises $399 Headless Mac… But Not From Apple

Arnold Kim reports on Macrumors.com that:

A company called Psystar has started advertising a $399 computer called “OpenMac” which claims to be a Leopard compatible Mac built from standard PC-parts. For $399, you get a tower computer with the following specs:

– 2.2GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
– 2GB of DDR2 667 memory
– Integrated Intel GMA 950 Graphics
– 20x DVD+/-R Drive
– 4 USB Ports
– 250GB 7200RPM Drive

Many of the components can be upgraded, however. For example, the graphics card can be updated to a GeForce 8600GT 512MB for $155 more.

Psystar is marketing this as a cheaper and more expandable alternative to a true Apple Mac.

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The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness Calls Upon Apple Inc. to Change New IMAC Campaign Claiming That, “You Can’t Be Too Thin. Or Too

Apple’s new IMAC Campagin states that, “You can’t be too thin. Or too powerful.” The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness calls upon Apple to rethink their new media campaign. In society in which 7 -10 million Americans are struggling with eating disorders, and messages from the media are influential and they do make a difference, The Alliance questions, “Is Apple taking a revamping of the Duchess of Windsor’s adage a step to far?”

North Palm Beach, FL (PRWEB) August 20, 2007 — The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness reacted today to the new Apple Inc IMAC Campaign, “The new iMac. You can’t be too thin. Or too powerful.” The Alliance questions, “What kind of message is Apple sending our youth with an ad campaign of this nature?”

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Revolution in The Valley: The Insanely Great Story of How the Mac Was Made

The Insanely Great Story of How the Mac Was Made

From Publishers Weekly
Another blog-turned-book (see Hertzfeld’s http://www.folklore.org), this set of remembrances chronicles the birth of the Macintosh from inside the lab. In 1978, Hertzfeld’s world was rocked by his purchase of an Apple II; by the next year, he was working for the fledgling company on the nascent Mac as a software engineer, co-writing the Mac’s operating system. Strictly for Silicon Valley-folk and Apple obsessives, Hertzfeld’s short entries dwell on everything from mouse-scaling parameters to the eating habits of hardware engineer Burrell Smith. A plethora of color photos feature early screen shots and sedentary-looking Mac team members in tight t-shirts (“User Friendly!”) and large glasses. Even aficionados may find their attention wandering at sentences like, “The most controversial part of the Control Panel was the desktop pattern editor, which I had rescued from its earlier standalone incarnation.” But among the 90 entries, highlights include awkward-looking early demos of the Mac’s operating system; competition and idea-swapping with Microsoft, Osborne and Xerox; and inside glimpses of Apple’s unique, before-the-boom culture. Hertzfeld’s earnest enthusiasm for the work that he and the team began 25-plus years ago is infectious enough to carry one through the rest.

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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